The Hoh River and Rainforest

Our final journey during our exploration of the Olympic Peninsula took us to one of the most unique ecosystems in all of North America; the temperate rainforest of the Hoh River Valley. The average annual rainfall of the forest is 120 inches, but we were greeted with another day of clear blue skies. The sunshine filtered down to the forest floor to illuminate the hanging mosses and ferns in an incredible shade of lime green. The crystal clear glacial waters of the Hoh provided the perfect setting for the students to perfect their stone-skipping skills. Our evening activity is a campfire with our guide, Nick; an ideal setting to reflect on our experiences of the trip.

Third Beach at La Push, WA

What a day! A hike through the forest to the coast. Here are a few highlights:

Banana Slug, Seals, Bald Eagles, crabs, anemones, starfish, coral, sculpins, waterfalls, barnacles, skunk cabbage, and an incredible beach surrounded by sea stacks and other rock formations.

Elwha River Day

The evening program last night and today’s adventures focused on the Elwha River watershed, the drainage that is currently the site of the largest restoration project of its kind in the world. Students had a chance to measure water quality, help prevent erosion by live-staking cottonwood trees, and explore the river in several areas. Our discussion focused on restoring the function of ecosystems and how we can apply the lessons of the Elwha to our own restoration at the Land. A highlight was our time at the mouth of the river where it meets the Strait of Juan de Fuca. There were seal and bald eagle sightings as well as an enormous supply of perfect skipping stones, some well-deserved down time for the students, and SUNSHINE!

Banana Slugs!

We had a great first day exploring Barnes Creek with Nick, our educator from Nature Bridge. Here are a few phrases to describe our day: rosemary potatoes, bald eagle, Merrymere Falls, sediment deposit, velocity, turbidity, observation, dissolved oxygen, games, and cookies!